Be an Early Bird for 2014-2015

Renew your membership by June 2, 2014 to be an Early Bird!

Five reasons why it’s great to be an  Early Bird. Logo_Color

  1.  You receive a special 2014-2015 Early Bird patch.
  2. This year includes new incentives:
    • Troops earn an Early Bird Bill worth $10 AND are entered into a drawing for an Early Bird Bill worth $100!
    • Girls are entered into a drawing to win one of fifteen Early Bird Bills worth $50!
  3.  You receive an automatic invitation to any of the Early Bird Hoedowns or Early Bird Baths!
  4. You’ll be set to start troop meetings right away in the fall.
  5. It’s a great way for girls to be self-sufficient by using their recently-earned Girl Scout Cookie Credit!

Register now and be an Early Bird! If you need more information on how you can be an Early Bird, contact your Membership Marketing Specialist or call 877-312-4764

 

 

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New Research Affirms Lifetime Benefits Of Girls’ Participation in Girl Scouting

According to a new Girl Scout Research Institute report, Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact Study, women who were Girl Scouts as children display significantly more positive life outcomes than non-Girl Scout alumnae.

Approximately one in every two adult women (49%) in the U.S. has at some point been a member of Girl Scouts; the average length of time a girl spends in Girl Scouting is four years. There are currently an estimated 59 million Girl Scout alumnae living in the U.S.

The study, which was not identified to participants as a Girl Scout project, surveyed a sample of 3,550 women aged 18 and older, roughly half of whom were Girl Scout alumnae and half drawn from the general population. The sample was chosen to be representative of the US population in terms of race/ethnicity, household income, education, marital status, and type of residence.

Compared to non-alumnae, Girl Scout alumnae display significantly more positive life outcomes on several indicators of success. These success indicators include:

  • Perceptions of self. Of Girl Scout alumnae, 63% consider themselves competent and capable, compared to 55% of non-alumnae.
  • Volunteerism and community work. Of Girl Scout alumnae who are mothers, 66% have been a mentor/volunteer in their child’s youth organization, compared to 48% of non-alumnae mothers.
  • Civic engagement. Of Girl Scout alumnae, 77% vote regularly, compared to 63% of non-alumnae.
  • Education. Of Girl Scout alumnae, 38% have attained college degrees, compared to 28% of non-alumnae.
  • Income/socioeconomic status. Girl Scout alumnae report a significantly higher household income ($51,700) than non-alumnae ($42,200).

In addition to collecting quantitative data, the researchers conducted a series of live interviews with Girl Scout alumnae. Overall, alumnae say Girl Scouting was positive and rewarding for them. Former Girl Scouts:

  • Rate their Girl Scouting experiences very highly. The average rating among all alumnae on a 1–10 scale is 8.04.
  • Fondly recall their experiences in Girl Scouting. Fun, friendships, and crafts are the most frequently cited positive aspects of Girl Scouting.
  • Say they’ve received concrete benefits from Girl Scouts, such as being exposed to nature and having a safe place to try new things.
  • Actively recognize the influence of Girl Scouting on their lives. Three quarters of alumnae report that the Girl Scout experience has had a positive impact on their lives in general. 

The positive effects of Girl Scouting seem particularly pronounced for women who were Girl Scouts longer, as well as for African American and Hispanic women.

“As Girl Scouts turns 100 years old, and we couldn’t ask for a better birthday present than this,” says Anne Soots, interim chief executive officer, Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland. “We declared 2012 as the Year of the Girl to help bring attention to girls and the value of encouraging and supporting them. To strengthen that support beyond the boundaries of Girl Scouting, we’ve launched ToGetHerThere, with the goal of reaching gender-balanced leadership in one generation. One kind of support we know girls need is role models—successful older women they can learn from and emulate. There is no group of women better suited to do that than our Girl Scout alumnae. So Girl Scout, phone home. We need you.”

To learn more about Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact study, or to obtain a copy, visit http://www.girlscouts.org/research. To join the Girl Scout Alumnae Association (where you may also obtain a copy of Girl Scouting Works), visit http://alumnae.girlscouts.org. To learn more about ToGetHerThere—and to take the pledge to support girls and girls’ leadership—visit http://togetherthere.org.

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2012 Teen Conference: Take Action for Yourself

IMPORTANT NOTE: The dates of the event have been moved back to April 28 and 29, and the registration deadline has been extended
to April 13!

forever greenGet ready for 25 hours of fun, discovery and friendships as you “Take Action for Yourself” at the Teen Conference! The conference is designed to help you tap in to the powerful person you are, as you learn and try new things and have a whole lot of fun with other girls your age from all over the council area.

The conference is open to Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors. It begins on Saturday, April 28 at 10:00 a.m. and ends at 11:00 a.m. Sunday, April 29. The cost of the conference is $50 per girl and $45 per adult. Cost includes 3 meals, a hotel room with three other people, program supplies and a gift bag for all girls!

 

Conference Highlights

  • Workshops
  • Fabulous free time
  • Make your voice heard
  • Be independent
  • So much more!

 

See the registration packet for more details, workshop descriptions, information for adults, and registration forms.

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Competition & STEM Program Opportunity for Girls

Girl Scouts of the USA is proud to be an outreach partner with the Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop and E-Line Media to introduce the second annual National STEM Video Game Challenge open to Girl Scouts! This challenge invites game makers to show their passion for playing and making video games and aims to motivate children’s interests in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Up for grabs is almost $200,000 in cash and prizes, with multiple ways to win! The entry period is open through March 12th, 2012. Finalists will be selected by a distinguished panel of judges and winners will be announced in the spring of 2012 at a major public event.

For more information on how Girl Scouts can enter the Youth Prize competition (middle school & high school) look here!

Challenges like this support Girl Scouts’ already strong commitment to STEM activities that are relevant to everyday life. Whether they’re discovering how a car’s engine runs, becoming math whizzes, or learning about careers in STEM fields, girls are moving forward into the future. Please look here for more information on all of our science offerings.

This challenge also compliments the Entertainment Technology Badge, where girls can dig into video game development! If you have girls earning this badge, encourage them to enter the STEM Video Challenge as well!

(originally posted by Joshua at GSUSA)

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Nobel Peace Prize Awarded to Three Women

During the Girl Scout Congressional Aide program, Kate, a Girl Scout, had the opportunity to meet Nobel Peace Prize winner Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

The New York Times reports that The Nobel Peace Prize for 2011 was awarded on Friday to three campaigning women from Africa and the Arab world in acknowledgment of their nonviolent role in promoting peace, democracy and gender equality. The winners were Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf — Africa’s first elected female president — her compatriot, peace activist Leymah Gbowee and Tawakul Karman of Yemen, a pro-democracy campaigner.

They were the first women to win the prize since Kenya’s Wangari Maathai, who died last month, was named as the laureate in 2004.

Most of the recipients in the award’s 110-year history have been men and Friday’s decision seemed designed to give impetus to the cause for women’s rights around the world.

“We cannot achieve democracy and lasting peace in the world unless women obtain the same opportunities as men to influence developments at all levels of society,” said the citation read by Thorbjorn Jagland, a former Norwegian prime minister who heads the Oslo-based Nobel committee that chooses the winner of the $1.5 million prize.

(Source: Joshua at GSUSA)

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Register to Receive Future Girl Scout Surveys

The National Program Evaluation System (NPES) registration process is well underway.  We encourage all members – girls and adults – to be a part of this survey system.  It has been developed to assess girls’ progress toward the benefits and outcomes that the Girl Scout Leadership Experience promises to all Girl Scouts.

The first step to participating in the NPES is to complete a registration survey.  Once you have completed the registration survey, you will become a part of the GSMH panel of participants, who may later be surveyed about their Girl Scout Leadership Experience. To begin this process and make sure your voice is heard, go to www.GirlScoutVoices.org.  For a paper version of the registration process, please contact the Senior Manager Leadership Program at 877-312-4764 x1327.

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