New Research Affirms Lifetime Benefits Of Girls’ Participation in Girl Scouting

According to a new Girl Scout Research Institute report, Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact Study, women who were Girl Scouts as children display significantly more positive life outcomes than non-Girl Scout alumnae.

Approximately one in every two adult women (49%) in the U.S. has at some point been a member of Girl Scouts; the average length of time a girl spends in Girl Scouting is four years. There are currently an estimated 59 million Girl Scout alumnae living in the U.S.

The study, which was not identified to participants as a Girl Scout project, surveyed a sample of 3,550 women aged 18 and older, roughly half of whom were Girl Scout alumnae and half drawn from the general population. The sample was chosen to be representative of the US population in terms of race/ethnicity, household income, education, marital status, and type of residence.

Compared to non-alumnae, Girl Scout alumnae display significantly more positive life outcomes on several indicators of success. These success indicators include:

  • Perceptions of self. Of Girl Scout alumnae, 63% consider themselves competent and capable, compared to 55% of non-alumnae.
  • Volunteerism and community work. Of Girl Scout alumnae who are mothers, 66% have been a mentor/volunteer in their child’s youth organization, compared to 48% of non-alumnae mothers.
  • Civic engagement. Of Girl Scout alumnae, 77% vote regularly, compared to 63% of non-alumnae.
  • Education. Of Girl Scout alumnae, 38% have attained college degrees, compared to 28% of non-alumnae.
  • Income/socioeconomic status. Girl Scout alumnae report a significantly higher household income ($51,700) than non-alumnae ($42,200).

In addition to collecting quantitative data, the researchers conducted a series of live interviews with Girl Scout alumnae. Overall, alumnae say Girl Scouting was positive and rewarding for them. Former Girl Scouts:

  • Rate their Girl Scouting experiences very highly. The average rating among all alumnae on a 1–10 scale is 8.04.
  • Fondly recall their experiences in Girl Scouting. Fun, friendships, and crafts are the most frequently cited positive aspects of Girl Scouting.
  • Say they’ve received concrete benefits from Girl Scouts, such as being exposed to nature and having a safe place to try new things.
  • Actively recognize the influence of Girl Scouting on their lives. Three quarters of alumnae report that the Girl Scout experience has had a positive impact on their lives in general. 

The positive effects of Girl Scouting seem particularly pronounced for women who were Girl Scouts longer, as well as for African American and Hispanic women.

“As Girl Scouts turns 100 years old, and we couldn’t ask for a better birthday present than this,” says Anne Soots, interim chief executive officer, Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland. “We declared 2012 as the Year of the Girl to help bring attention to girls and the value of encouraging and supporting them. To strengthen that support beyond the boundaries of Girl Scouting, we’ve launched ToGetHerThere, with the goal of reaching gender-balanced leadership in one generation. One kind of support we know girls need is role models—successful older women they can learn from and emulate. There is no group of women better suited to do that than our Girl Scout alumnae. So Girl Scout, phone home. We need you.”

To learn more about Girl Scouting Works: The Alumnae Impact study, or to obtain a copy, visit http://www.girlscouts.org/research. To join the Girl Scout Alumnae Association (where you may also obtain a copy of Girl Scouting Works), visit http://alumnae.girlscouts.org. To learn more about ToGetHerThere—and to take the pledge to support girls and girls’ leadership—visit http://togetherthere.org.

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Girl Scouts Celebrates 100 Years Of Leadership Development

Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland – with members throughout central and southern Missouri,
southeast Kansas, and northeast Oklahoma – joins Girl Scouts around the country to celebrate
the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts in 2012. March 12, 2012 will mark 100 years from the day
that the first Girl Scout troop was established in the United States.

Self-discovery and community service were core values that Girls Scouts founder Juliette
Gordon Low sought to instill in girls from the earliest days. In 1912, many girls’ paths in life were
limited and Low’s vision was to establish an organization where any girl could expand her
personal horizon by having fun while exploring new interests and contributing to society. With
3.2 million members, Girl Scouts is today’s preeminent leadership development program for
girls.

“This special anniversary is an opportunity to celebrate the long and proud history of Girl
Scouting and to engage our girls in making our communities and the world a better place,” said
Girl Scouts of the Missouri Heartland’s interim CEO, Anne Soots. “It is also an opportunity to
thank the countless committed volunteers in our community who give so much to Girl Scouting
all year long. The encouragement, coaching and resources from adults are crucial for girls to be
able to develop their leadership skills.”

Girls will be celebrating through the end of 2012, including at the Believe in Girls 5K and Expo in
Springfield, Missouri on March 31, 2012 and Camporees in Sikeston, Sedalia, and Nevada in
September. They will also, as always, give back to their communities in big ways. During this
year’s Girl Scout Cookie Program, many Girl Scout troops have participated in the Cookie Share
program, through which Girl Scout Cookies are shared with military organizations or food
pantries. At summer camp and locally, girls will also be participating in Girl Scouts Forever
Green projects to promote environmental stewardship.

For information about 100th anniversary initiatives, including the Believe in Girls 5K and Expo
and Girl Scout summer camp, call 877-312-4764 or visit www.girlscoutsmoheartland.org.

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2012 Cookie Program Extension

You may be aware that some areas of our council were recently affected by tornadoes. This natural disaster has impacted the ability for troops in those areas to fully participate in the cookie program this year. For this reason, GSMH has decided to extend the cookie program throughout the entire council for 2 additional weeks. Please read this information in full for complete details. If you have any questions, please contact your local Product Program Specialist.

  • The final day of the cookie program is March 25. Troops can continue with direct selling until this day.
  • Service Center cookie cupboards will be open 11:00-4:30 M-F while they have cookies in stock. Note: Closed on Saturdays
  • Cookies of most varieties are still available at all cupboard locations.
  • Cookies will continue to be $4/box throughout the sale.
  • Girls can continue to accumulate recognitions throughout the extended sale.

 Money deadlines:

  • March 14: Troop deposits for all cookies ordered through March 11.
  • March 28: Final troop deposits for cookies ordered March 12-25.

Note: If your service unit has been piloting the ACH auto-withdraw plan, your final deadline still applies. If your troop participates in the extended program, you will need to make a final deposit into a council account. These monies will not be removed from your individual troop accounts.

Recognition deadlines:

  • For troops not participating in the extended sale: March 14.
  • For troops participating in the extended sale: March 27.

Note:  If additions/changes  are made that will affect the girl totals toward recognitions please remember to update any information when doing transfers and placing the recognition order.

 Paperwork deadline:

  • Final paperwork will be due Friday, March 30.

 

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Join the Doodle 4 Google!


Exciting news! Girl Scouts of the USA has the opportunity to participate in Doodle 4 Google, a contest where students in the United States are invited to use their artistic talents to think big and redesign Google’s homepage logo for millions to see. This year, students are asked to exercise their creative imaginations around the theme, “If I could travel in time, I’d visit…” One lucky student artist will see their artwork appear on the Google homepage and take home some cool prizes—and as a special bonus, the winning artwork will appear on a limited edition of Crayola’s iconic 64 box!

The Doodle 4 Google competition is now open to all K-12 students in U.S. schools (including homeschoolers). Parents, teachers, or after school programs may submit doodles on behalf of their child or student as long as they are accompanied by a completed and signed entry form. Completed entry forms must be received by March 23rd and can be found here http://www.google.com/doodle4google/request.html for download or regular mail.

We encourage all Girl Scouts to get creative and apply for Doodle 4 Google right away! There are exciting prizes, including the opportunity to win a $30,000 college scholarship, and much more!

Additionally, Girl Scouts of the USA is encouraging troops to submit videos of girls engaged in Doodle 4 Google to their council office. These videos will be forwarded to GSUSA and might be seen nationally! In order to maintain consistency, all videos need to be shot on an iPhone and the video files sent to the council. To submit completed Doodle 4 Google videos, upload the video file using the GSMH file uploader page: http://www.girlscoutsmoheartland.org/photos .

Remember to keep clips short and the camera as stable as possible. Please don’t forget to have everyone sign release forms, which can be found here http://www.girlscoutsmoheartland.org/pages/policies.php#prpolicies.

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